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Migrant Entrepreneurship in OECD Countries
OECD Publishing , Publication date:  07 Dec 2010
Pages: 312 , Language: English
Version: Print (Paperback) + PDF
ISBN: 9789264095823 , OECD Code: 812010221P1
Price:   €89 | $124 | £80 | ¥11500 | MXN1600 , Standard shipping included!
Availability: Available (Print on Demand)
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Other Versions:  E-book - PDF Format

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Description

Migrants contribute to the economic growth of their host countries in many ways, bringing new skills and competencies with them and helping to reduce labour shortages.  An aspect that has received only limited attention up to now is migrantsí contribution to entrepreneurial activity and employment creation in their host countries.  In OECD countries, entrepreneurship is slightly higher among immigrants than natives and the total number of persons employed in migrant businesses is substantial, although the survival rate of these businesses is often lower than that of their native counterparts. Migrant entrepreneurship has gone beyond traditional ethnic businesses, into a wide range of sectors and innovative areas.  

Greater knowledge of migrant entrepreneurship is essential if policy makers are to better support migrant enterprises and their role in economic growth and job creation. In addition, increasing awareness of the positive role that migrants can play as entrepreneurs could contribute to a more balanced public debate on immigration.   Taking a cross-country perspective, this publication sheds light on these issues and more, discussing policy options to foster the development and success of migrant businesses. It is a compilation of papers presented at a June 2010 conference organised by the OECD Secretariat, with the financial support of the Swedish and Turkish authorities, and the Dutch-Turkish Businessmen Association (HOTIAD).

http://www.oecd.org/els/migration/entrepreneurship


Table of contents:

Main findings of the Conference on Entrepreneurship and Employment Creation of Immigrants in OECD Countries, 9-10 June 2010, Paris by Maria Vincenza Desiderio and John Salt
PART I. MIGRANT ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN OECD COUNTRIES: MAGNITUDE, CONTRIBUTION TO EMPLOYMENT AND SPECIFIC MIGRATION POLICIES
Chapter 1. Migrant entrepreneurship in OECD countries and its contribution to employment
by Josep Mestres
-
Summary
-Introduction
-1.1. Measuring migrant entrepreneurship: definition and potential data sources
-1.2. What is the relative scope and profile of migrant entrepreneurship?
-1.3. Contribution of migrants to employment creation
-1.4. What factors are behind a migrantís entrepreneurship decision?
-1.5. Conclusion
-Annex 1.A1. Descriptive statistics for United States, United Kingdom, France and Spain native and foreign-born
Chapter 2. Migration policies in OECD countries to manage the migration of foreign entrepreneurs and investors by Maria Vincenza Desiderio
-
Summary
-2.1. The entry and stay of foreign entrepreneurs and investors
-2.2. Permit regimes for foreign entrepreneurs and investors
-2.3. The contribution of special programmes to entrepreneurship and investment by immigrants in OECD countries
-2.4. Conclusion
-Annex 2.A1. Supplementary tables on investors and self-employed/entrepreneurs
-Annex 2.A2. International agreements that play a role in regulating migration of foreign entrepreneurs and investors
PART II. THE DETERMINANTS OF MIGRANT ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND EMPLOYMENT CREATION BY IMMIGRANTS IN OECD COUNTRIES
Chapter 3. Shifting landscapes of immigrant entrepreneurship by Robert Kloosterman and Jan Rath
-
Summary
-3.1. Immigrant entrepreneurship
-3.2. Matching entrepreneurs with the opportunity structure
-3.3. The role of regulation
-3.4. Options for policy makers
Chapter 4. The determinants of immigrant entrepreneurship and employment creation in Portugal by Catarina Reis Oliveira
-
Summary
-4.1. Immigrant entrepreneurship in Portugal: tendencies of the past three decades
-4.2. The determinants of immigrant entrepreneurship: the Portuguese case
-4.3. Group opportunities
-4.4. Personal resources
-4.5. Conclusion
Chapter 5. Entrepreneurship among immigrants in Switzerland by …tienne Piguet
-
Summary
-5.1. The Swiss context
-5.2. Self-employed persons of foreign origin
-5.3. Education level and sector of activity
-5.4. Entrepreneur employers
-5.5. Factors explaining self-employment
PART III. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND EMPLOYMENT CREATION BY IMMIGRANTS: EXPERIENCES FROM SELECTED OECD COUNTRIES
Chapter 6. Business creation in France by entrepreneurs from outside the European Union
by Sandrine Plana
Summary
-6.1. Sources of information on entrepreneurs
-6.2. The profile of the businesses created by entrepreneurs of foreign nationality
-6.3. The business set-up process for foreign entrepreneurs
-6.4. The profile of entrepreneurs
-6.5. The motivations of entrepreneurs
-6.6. How do these businesses develop?
Chapter 7. Self-employment amongst ethnic and migrant groups in the United Kingdom by Stephen Drinkwater
-
Summary
-7.1. Recent migration patterns and composition of the immigrant population in the United Kingdom
-7.2. Main determinants and characteristics of self-employment amongst ethnic groups in the United Kingdom
-7.3. Conclusion and policy recommendations
Chapter 8. Chinese entrepreneurship in Canada by Peter S. Li
-
Summary
-8.1. Concept of ethnic or immigrant entrepreneurship
-8.2. Historical overview of Chinese business engagement in Canada
-8.3. Current situation of Chinese entrepreneurship in Canada
-8.4. Conclusion
-Annex 8.A1. Estimated number of workers employed by businesses that used different languages, 2001, 2006
Chapter 9. Mexican-American entrepreneurs and their contribution to the US economy by Robert W. Fairlie
-
Summary
-9.1. Mexican-American rates of business ownership and performance
-9.2. Explanations for business formation and performance patterns
-9.3. The contribution of Mexican immigrant business owners to the US economy
-5.6. Indicators and method
-5.7. General findings
-5.8. Results by national origin
-5.9. Conclusion
-Annex 5.A1. Legal and sociological definitions of self-employment
-Annex 5.A2. Population covered by the RFP 2000 analysis
Chapter 10. Migrant women entrepreneurhip in OECD countries by TŁzin Baycan-Levent
Summary
-10.1. Gender dimensions of the ethnic economy
-10.2. Migrant womenís entrepreneurship
-10.3. Migrant women entrepreneurship in selected OECD countries
-10.4. Conclusion: the way forward for researchers and policy makers
PART IV. THE CONTRIBUTION OF MIGRANT ENTREPRENEURS TO INNOVATION AND THE EXPANSION OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE
Chapter 11. Skilled immigrantsí contribution to innovation and entrepreneurship in the United States
by Jennifer Hunt
-
Summary
-11.1. Data
-11.2. Immigrant performance relative to native performance
-11.3. Conclusion 
Chapter 12. The contribution of migrants in enhancing foreign trade by Andreas Hatzigeorgiou
-
Summary12.1. Conceptual framework
-12.2. Evidence
-12.3. Methodological aspects
-12.4. Conclusion
PART V. SPECIFIC DIFFICULTIES FACED BY IMMIGRANTS IN SETTING UP AND DEVELOPING THEIR BUSINESSES: EVIDENCE FROM SELECTEDOECD COUNTRIES
Chapter 13. Enterprises created in 2002 by non-EU nationals in France: finding it harder to survive
by Yves Breem
-
Summary
-13.1. Features of third-country firms set up during the first half of 2002
-.2. SINE survey
Chapter 14. Latina entrepreneurship and recent self-employment trends
in the United States
by Magnus Lofstrom
-
Summary
-14.1. Recent trends in self-employment in the United States
-14.2. Latina self-employment performance
-14.3. Conclusion
Chapter 15. Improving access to credit for migrant enterprises by Daniela Bobeva
-
Summary
-15.1. Bankability of migrant enterprises
-15.2. Current approaches to facilitate access to credit for migrant enterprises
-15.3. The way foreword to improve access to credit for migrant enterprises

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