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Energy Policies of IEA Countries
Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Switzerland 2012
IEA. Published by : OECD Publishing , Date de parution:  25 juil 2012
Pages: 150 , Langue: Anglais
Version: Livre (Broché) + PDF
ISBN: 9789264171480 , Code OCDE: 612012041P1
Prix:   €75 | $105 | £67 | ¥9700 | MXN1350 , Frais de livraison inclus
Disponibilité: Disponible
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Autres versions:  Livre électronique - Format PDF

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Description

This 2012 IEA review of Swiss energy policies finds that Switzerland has taken bold decisions to gradually phase out nuclear power and to reduce by a fifth its greenhouse gas emissions by 2020 with domestic measures only. These are challenging objectives, and the country now needs to identify the most viable ways to meet them at least cost and minimum risk to energy security.

In the absence of nuclear power, maintaining sufficient electricity capacity will require strong policies to promote energy efficiency and renewable energy. Such measures have already been outlined, but they will likely not be enough. For baseload generation, gas-fired power plants would be the simplest option. Treating their CO2 emissions the same way as in the neighbouring countries would be a strong positive incentive for investors.

Because Switzerland’s energy-related CO2 emissions come mostly from oil use in transport and space heating, action is most needed in these areas. Commendably, the country is making polluters pay by using a CO2 tax for financing decarbonisation efforts in space heating. Stronger efforts will be needed to reduce emissions from private car use, however.

Since the 2007 IEA energy policy review, Switzerland has made clear progress in electricity market reform. Moving to a fully open market by 2015 would be a further positive step. The system of regulated end-user prices, however, is subsidising electricity consumption at a time when low-carbon power supply is becoming more constrained and expensive. It should be reconsidered. Switzerland should also continue to take an increasingly European approach to developing its electricity infrastructure, to its own benefit and to that of its neighbours.

Tables des matières:

1. Executive Summary and Key Recommendations 
-Executive summary
-Key recommendations
PART I.  POLICY ANALYSIS
2. General Energy Policy
-Country overview
-Supply and demand
-Institutions
-Key policies
-Critique
-Recommendations
3. Climate Change and Energy Efficiency
-Climate change overview
-CO2 emissions from fuel combustion
-Climate change policies and measures
-Energy efficiency overview
-Energy demand
-Energy efficiency policy and institutional framework
-Sectoral policies and measures
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART II. SECTOR ANALYSIS
4. Oil
-Supply and demand
-Infrastructure
-Market structure
-Prices and taxes
-Security of supply
-Critique
-Recommendations
5. Natural Gas
-Supply and demand
-Legal framework
-Infrastructure
-Industry structure
-Prices and taxes
-Security of supply
-Critique
-Recommendations
6. Renewable Energy
-Supply and demand
-Policies and measures
-Critique
-Recommendations
7. Nuclear Energy
-Overview
-Legal framework
-Lifetime of nuclear power plants
-Nuclear safety
-Waste disposal and decommissioning
-Critique
-Recommendations
8. Electricity
-Supply and demand
-Legal framework
-Industry structure
-Transmission and distribution
-Prices and taxes
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART III.  ENERGY TECHNOLOGY
9. Energy Technology Research, Development and Demonstration
-Overview
-Institutional framework
-Policies and programmes
-Programme evaluation
-Funding mechanisms and levels
-Public/private partnerships
-International collaboration
-Critique
-Recommendations
PART IV.  ANNEXES
Annex A: Organisation of the review
Annex B: Energy balances and key statistical data
Annex C: International Energy Agency Shared Goals
Annex D: Glossary and list of abbreviations

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